Translation Tag

One of my commenters has asked an excellent question about Matthew 28:1 (and several other verses), centering on the fact that the Greek word σάββατoν (sabbaton, "Sabbath" or "week"), which occurs twice in the verse, is translated differently each time. He observes that the same...

Haven't had much chance to blog lately as I've been feverishly preparing for my preliminary exams (took my Greek prelim on Monday, with my four main subject exams coming the week after Thanksgiving), but lots has been happening out there and I can't stay away...

Spanish reporter Ines Sainz (former Miss Spain 1997) was reportedly "harassed" (that is, players in the locker room were making comments about her) in the Jets' locker room, and now there's all sorts of controversy. First of all, Sainz herself has posted a picture on Twitter...

Stephen Carlson has put up a good post on why the translation of σάρξ as anything other than "flesh" in Gal 3:3 is "weak tea." Carlson observes that Paul is making a point concerning literal flesh—the foreskin—but many translations unfortunately treat Paul's language as metaphoric,...

Fellow blogger Dr. Joel Hoffman has announced his newest book, And God Said: How Translations Conceal the Bible's Original Meaning, which deals with some of the tricky aspects of Bible translation and the way that English translations often obscure the meaning of the ancient texts...

Joel Hoffman has just posted on the subject of Bible translations for children, spurred by Ellen Frankel's post on "Making the Bible PG." Hoffman brings up some good points about children speaking a different dialect than their parents and lacking the conceptual base to understand...

The Huffington Post is reporting (via Beliefnet and other sources) an astonishingly brazen project put forth by conservapedia.com (which itself could leave someone speechless): the "Conservative Bible Project." This project undertakes to eliminate "liberal bias" from the Bible, since the proponent(s) of this project suggest that modern Bible translations are dominated by just such liberalism. After establishing that "conservative principles" (such as what?) are needed to "reduce and eliminate" the numerous liberal errors that have crept into the Bible, the project sets forth guidelines for the new translation:
Joel Hoffman has just observed that he thinks many people prefer the "blank slate" that comes from incoherent translation because it allows them to see whatever they choose in the passage. That is, they can get whatever "feel" they want from it, without having things like the actual meaning getting in their way. I've been thinking about exactly this point of late, especially after putting together a few of my "Misunderstood Bible Passages" posts. It struck me that many of the interpretive problems I'm trying to correct are the result of one or both of two things: