Pedagogy Tag

I recently (as in the spring of 2012; wow, this post has been in draft for awhile!) gave a guest lecture in Bart Ehrman's Introduction to New Testament and Early Christian Literature class. Bart periodically has his senior students give a lecture or two for experience...

Two posts ago, I talked about one big change I made to my Introduction to the New Testament class last summer, choosing to take the students through the Synoptic Gospels before teaching the Synoptic Problem itself. That change seemed immensely helpful, as it took an...

I had the opportunity to teach a five-week course of "Introduction to New Testament Literature" at UNC-Chapel Hill this summer, and I took the opportunity to reexamine and revamp a few aspects of how I've taught that course (or have seen others teach it) in...

James McGrath has brought up the question of whether participation grades are worthwhile or should be eliminated: I've tried to use participation grades and I'm thinking the time has come to ditch them and simply leave it up to the student to learn as ...

My Journal of Religion and Film review of Christopher Nolan's "Inception" is now available. There was a lot I had to leave out due to space constraints, but overall I'm pleased with the outcome, minus the grammatical error the editor managed to introduce into my article....

Not many get to be (or want to be) a biblical scholar, but lots of people want to read and understand the Bible well. What must one do to become a good Bible reader? J. R. Daniel Kirk gives exactly the answer that I have...

Joel Hoffman has just posted on the subject of Bible translations for children, spurred by Ellen Frankel's post on "Making the Bible PG." Hoffman brings up some good points about children speaking a different dialect than their parents and lacking the conceptual base to understand...

Joel Hoffman has just observed that he thinks many people prefer the "blank slate" that comes from incoherent translation because it allows them to see whatever they choose in the passage. That is, they can get whatever "feel" they want from it, without having things like the actual meaning getting in their way. I've been thinking about exactly this point of late, especially after putting together a few of my "Misunderstood Bible Passages" posts. It struck me that many of the interpretive problems I'm trying to correct are the result of one or both of two things:

John Hobbins over at Ancient Hebrew Poetry has put up an outstanding post on reading the Bible, gracefully making a point I've emphasized for years: Claims about the Bible work best if you take the time to actually read its contents with the empathy one reserves...