Paul Tag

This month's Biblical Archaeology Review includes a nice piece by Doron Mendels on Why Paul Went West (subscription required), highlighting the difference between the Jewish diaspora communities of the (Roman/Hellenistic) west and the (Babylonian) east, explaining that it only makes sense for Paul, with his...

I'm pleased to report that I have officially advanced to the rank of Ph.D. Candidate. I had my oral defense yesterday (following a nightmare of a week with four prelims in five days last week) and was a bit surprised afterwards to have been awarded...

Haven't had much chance to blog lately as I've been feverishly preparing for my preliminary exams (took my Greek prelim on Monday, with my four main subject exams coming the week after Thanksgiving), but lots has been happening out there and I can't stay away...

Stephen Carlson has put up a good post on why the translation of σάρξ as anything other than "flesh" in Gal 3:3 is "weak tea." Carlson observes that Paul is making a point concerning literal flesh—the foreskin—but many translations unfortunately treat Paul's language as metaphoric,...

Just got back from the 2009 SBL Annual Meeting; I'm exhausted, but it was a fun and very productive trip. Some highlights (in no particular order): 1) The "Early Jewish-Christian Relations" section on Saturday morning. Though I don't think any of the participants "nailed it" exactly,...

Approximate reading time: 7.5 minutes. *If new to this series, you might want to check the introduction.* The first three installments of this series covered misinterpretations most often seen at the popular level. While today's passage is indeed commonly misinterpreted at the popular level, it is surprisingly very often misconstrued even at the highest levels of scholarship. The passage is found in 1 Thessalonians 5, where Paul begins to discuss the "Day of the Lord" (or "the Lord's Day"; a term denoting the eschatological "Sabbath," when Christ will return):
Word is out (see the Better Bibles Blog, for example) that an updated version of the NIV will be released in 2011. Mark Goodacre (and a happy 6th anniversary of blogging to Mark) and others have already noted their hopes that the NIV finally drop "sinful nature" as a translation of σάρξ (sarx), which means "flesh." As Goodacre notes, this translation of such a key term "makes [the NIV] unusable as a translation for teaching Paul," a sentiment with which I strongly agree.

Mark Goodacre has posted a link on his blog to an interesting review on the PBS Religion and Ethics Newsweekly site by Allen Dwight Callahan called "The Real Paul." It's an interesting read, with much of it poking holes in the flawed anti-imperialist picture of...

Loren Rossen has proposed another meme, which Stephen Carlson has re-titled "The Five Frustrating Books Meme." Rossen's explanation of the meme is as follows:...