Education

Thomas Friedman has managed to publish a good op-ed in the NYTimes, one in which he looks at America's shrinking status as a superpower and persistent educational failings (building off two other recent pieces, this one by Michael Hirsh and this one by Robert Samuelson)...

Good piece in the NY Times about recent research on study habits that essentially vindicates the way I have approached my studies for a long time (that is, violating many aspects of "received wisdom" for what intuitively seemed to work better). One thing I'd emphasize...

Language indeed shapes the way we think, says Lera Boroditsky's article in the Wall Street Journal. For anyone with any common sense (or language training), this shouldn't be especially surprising, but it is an interesting read nonetheless, exploring how the latest cognitive research demonstrates testable...

A while back, I did a brief interview for a blog article examining ESPN's "Outside the Lines" report on the Florida State athletic department's academic scandal; since I was both a former player (albeit briefly) and a former tutor in the athletic department, I was...

Chuck Klosterman has a fantastic article up on ESPN.com. He's not correct on all the football details (such as referring to former top-ranked prep QB and #1 draft pick Tim Couch as an "ungifted quarterback"), but the article is fabulous. Klosterman shows how "liberal" the game of American football actually is, with its radical changes over the years, and contrasts that with its "conservative" image, with the way football's innovators are consistently maligned for bucking orthodoxy. The very people permanently changing the sport by doing the things everyone will be doing ten years later are the people labeled lunatics by the majority of the football world.
Joel Hoffman has just observed that he thinks many people prefer the "blank slate" that comes from incoherent translation because it allows them to see whatever they choose in the passage. That is, they can get whatever "feel" they want from it, without having things like the actual meaning getting in their way. I've been thinking about exactly this point of late, especially after putting together a few of my "Misunderstood Bible Passages" posts. It struck me that many of the interpretive problems I'm trying to correct are the result of one or both of two things:

John Hobbins over at Ancient Hebrew Poetry has put up an outstanding post on reading the Bible, gracefully making a point I've emphasized for years: Claims about the Bible work best if you take the time to actually read its contents with the empathy one reserves...